Titles By Elaine Littau:

Nan's Heritage Series:


Book I, Nan's Journey

Book II, Elk's Resolve

Book III, Luke's Legacy

Book IV, The Eyes of a Stranger

Book V, Timothy's Home



From the next series - Rescued...A Series of Hope:



Book I, Some Happy Day

Book II, Capture the Wandering Heart

Book III, Walk Slowly Through the Dark



New Series- Nashville

Book I, Six Miles From Nashville

Book II, Christmas in Nashville (Coming soon)





go to http://elainelittau.com/ to order.







I have the first 3 chapters of "Some Happy Day" available to readers for free on my website, http://elainelittau.com/







Sunday, August 4, 2013

Not Perfect, but Loved

A few years ago, before our latest grandson was born, we had family photos taken by Terry Peak. One of my favorite shots of the grandkids is the imperfect one I have posted here. I have used this picture in most of my speaking engagements for an introduction of myself. As you know, grandmas are defined by the people they love. Even though there are tears on one, scowls on a couple, and indifference on the other; I still see my precious grands. In fact, every time I look at this picture I pause and smile. Most of the pictures I take of them that are posed are all beautiful smiles and I love those, but this one... well...I love it. It makes me wonder if God looks at me in my imperfections and smiles. Ladies, you know how we struggle to hide all the little spots and blemishes on our face, cover and camouflage excess pounds. Sometimes I just throw up my hands and decide I have done all I can do and give up. Jesus looks at us and sees his precious child when we give up the 'cover up' and just offer ourselves as we are to Him. There is nothing like the embrace of the Holy Spirit to let you know you are 'accepted in the beloved'. "Beloved"... I am loved! Next time you see your imperfections, realize this...YOU ARE LOVED by the Lord!

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Digging Into the Past

Last year I stepped out of my comfort zone and began to write a "modern day" book. Six Miles from Nashville is set in the 1970s. When I told my sons I was writing something modern, they told me that 1970s was not MODERN. I beg to differ. Those were my Jr. High and High School years. The process of writing this book was more difficult than I could imagine. Stepping back into those years brought back a lot of memories I hadn't thought about in a long time. Most of the memories were great...and then...there were some I would rather forget. Lest you think the book is a autobiography of my life, I want to assure you it is NOT. The mood of the people of the time is from my perspective. I was and still am, a small town girl in the heartland of the USA. I wrote the book from that frame of mind. I love the area where I live and the people who are determined enough to live here. In those days, everyone didn't have internet or more than four television channels. We believed everything that was on the news and in the newspapers. Styles and language didn't travel to our little town until it was old news in California and New York. I remember a time when two teens came to speak to our youth group. They were from California. My best friend and I tried to take notes on the really neat slang they were saying. We thought their expressions were the best thing since sliced bread. Today things are so different. People learn styles and all of that in real time. I think having the Wards and Sears catalogs did help a lot of us be sort of current. In my town, not everyone was a member of the YMCA and could play sports. (Now days, those who can't afford it are provided for.) My parents had enough money for me to be in the Y, but that wasn't a priority for them. I was not very coordinated, so it wasn't a priority for me either. I do know that not everyone who was on a team was allowed to play. Most of the high school football players were on the bench waiting of an opportunity to play if the stars needed a break. That was before the days where everyone received a trophy for just showing up. The trophy holders really did earn the trophy. Since I am ranting, I have difficulty understanding how the High School graduates these days have a grade point average well over 100%. Our top grads made from 90%to 99.99%. There were no honors classes or bonus points to be earned. About half or less of the graduates went to college. The rest managed to build a life without it. They entered the trades of carpentry, oil field work, plumbers, electricians, farming and a host of other blue collar work. Some of these people were honor grads. I was able to go to Bible College because the denomination I was a part of had a small Bible College in Kansas that accepted free will offerings as tuition. My dad was retired and we didn't have a lot of extra money for my education, so this was a good fit. I am very blessed that I went there because that is the place I met the love of my life. We were engaged while we attended there. Things were different back then. Christian morality was taken seriously. Christians didn't live together without marriage. We tried to dress modestly in the age of mini skirts and tight jeans. We weren't perfect, but we knew right from wrong. We took responsibility for our actions. Our parents taught us that if we made wrong decisions, they were our decisions and nobody's fault but our own. Sometimes I wish for those days, but I am so glad for my life now. I will dig into the past to write books, but I don't want to dwell thee.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

One Author's Journey Between Books

It is difficult to admit sometimes that when life gets busy, Bible study time is put on the shelf. It seems that for three weeks it has been a struggle to get back to consistency in this daily practice. I could use the excuse that I have been on vacation for two of those weeks and brought three grandchildren home with me, but two of them are teens and the youngest is soon to be eight. They are hardly what you would consider high maintenance. One day this week I pulled out my Bible and my copy of Streams in the Desert and began another attempt to get back into the groove of daily devotions. Looking at the last page I read in the devotional reading book made me realize just how long it had been since I had carved out time for it. Mind you, there have been countless prayers going up during my lack of devotional time, but it just wasn't the same as listening to the words of the Lord. It was more like a one-sided conversation. (I really hate to do all the talking because I already know all my stuff and find that I am not that interesting.) I knew I NEEDED to hear the voice of God. My Bible reading was in I John. It was like a refreshing rain breaking a drought. My soul drank the Word and felt refreshed yet, I knew I was still parched deep down. It reminded me of going out to our pasture next to our dried up garden and seeing the inch wide cracks that have developed during the past few summers. I was watering the horse that day and decided to fill in that one crack with water. I stood there with the water hose going full blast for several minutes and the water never did get the gash in the ground full. I have to admit that it sort of scared me to think that our ground was that dry. I know my soul is similar to that wounded patch of earth. I need a refilling of the Holy Spirit. I also know that God does not hold back when we ask. I opened the devotional book after reading the first and second chapter of I John. On the reading marked for June 9. The Scripture reading was Psalm 37:3 - "Trust in the Lord and do good; dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture." In the words for this date, the writer expressed the thought of "borrowing trouble". My daddy always told us not to "borrow trouble", so this was not a new thought. The line, "I'll bear the sorrow that comes tomorrow, but I'll borrow none today." penetrated through the dryness of my spirit. I was reminded that I am not responsible for how things turn out for my children or grandchildren or any of the people I love. I had let worry of these things sap strength out of me. I know the words were penned back in the 1920s, but they were relevant to me on Monday of this week. It was as if the Holy Spirit was pouring water and oil into my thirsty, cracked heart. I was refreshed. Thank you, God for your mercy and tender-loving care! Elaine Littau, author

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Spring Cleaning in Not For Wimps

Here in the Texas Panhandle it seemed that Spring would never arrive. The temperature would reach 70 degrees one day and the next day it snowed. (This happened in May!) Because of this, it has been difficult to believe that the season would ever change. I went to my sister's house and they were in full swing of planting flowers, repairing irrigation to them, fertilizing, reseeding the lawn, and working on fountains. They keep a beautiful yard. They sat down for a break when I came to visit. Seeing all this activity caused me to feel somewhat lazy. So... Yesterday I got out my water hose and began spraying the dirt from the windows and brick. The last time we had a little sprinkle of rain or a dusting of snow, my windows looked like someone had taken a squirt bottle and sprayed the windows with mud. I had to get that off the windows. Little dirty rivers trickled down between the bricks as I sprayed the entire exterior of the house. I got in the screened in porch and swept it clean, sprinkled it the floor with detergent, and blasted it with the water hose. It took awhile to broom off the standing water, but shooting the floor, stucco ceiling, and screens with blasts from the water hose made everything smell so fresh. There was still a little bit of standing water on the porch so I got out my little Mint robot, "Cindy" (short for Cinderella) and had her mop up the rest. The result is a really nice and clean floor on the porch. I then went to the decks and washed them off. We have two small ones that are at two of our doors and one larger one that is outside our dining room and patio doors. I was amazed at the difference rinsing them off with the water hose did. Next, I went to the patio area at the West side of the house. We like to sit there in pretty weather and watch the sun set over the prairie. Our little family had labored many hours in making the patio with a concrete form that shaped the concrete into what is supposed to look like rocks. We didn't get it all that level, so dirt collects in the low spots. We should redo it, but I can still see my teen aged sons and hubby as they work on this. (I helped, too. Stop laughing....I really did!) We have buffalo grass and I am so grateful. It is sturdy stuff that doesn't die when there is a drought. However, even the buffalo grass is looking like it is on its last legs. I decided that I had to water it after I made sure all the trees were watered. People from other places do not think I have many trees, but they haven't had to water them. We have somewhere between 60 to 80. Our cedar windbreak is looking pretty bad. There are many dead limbs. I am desperate to save those trees because they are our privacy for the swimming pool. (One of those above ground kind with the blow up ring. We have a terrible time getting the ph right on it, but that is another story.) I know we live in the country, but a neighbor owns a roping arena next to our house and pool...Sometimes they go out there to practice calf roping or to plow it up. (makes a nice dusty mess for my screened in porch) I can stay in the pool because of those trees. Without them...I would be inside. By the time everything was washed up with the water hose and the sprinkler set...I was pooped. There is no way my yard will compare to my sweet sister's, but I was happy for the hope I have for the coming seasons. I love to take good care of the things God has given us. We have been working on the laundry room. Terry laid a new floor and I have been painting some. My biggest struggle has been with removing the wallpaper border. Grrr. Nothing is more motivating than watching a marathon of "Hoarders" on television. lol Terry was okay with getting rid of some of my excess, but not very inspired about looking over his stuff. I think all of us are a little like this aren't we? Right now, I have a half-painted laundry room, a bunch of boxes of things to donate and only a pocket full of energy to complete everything. I will keep you posted!

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Interview with Jordan Maxwell

1. Jordan Maxwell, What is/are the title(s) of your book(s)? * * My first novel is titled “Dandyflowers”. My second, which continues the story, is called “Dandyflowers – Laura’s Diaries”. *********** *
************* 2. What is your genre and why did you choose to write in this genre? ************* * My books tend to cross over a couple of genres; those being Young Adult and Romance. I write for these two genres because they are the most popular and have the biggest audience. I also write in these styles because I have to children; a daughter and a son, who are both “readers”. I want to have stories available to them that I would approve of. *************** * 3. Is there a particular message you wish to transfer to your readers? ************* * The “Dandyflowers” series; I am writing the third and final book in the series right now, has one core message that is: Love the ones you love with all you have all the time because you never know when your last goodbye will truly be your last goodbye. ************ * 4. Did you find yourself researching information during the writing process? * ************* Absolutely! The majority of my books take place between August 1962 and August 1969 and a lot of well known events took place during that time period i.e. John Glenn orbiting the earth, the Kennedy assassination, Bobby Kennedy’s murder, Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, the Apollo 11 moon landing etc. To include these in the story line I had to do quite a bit of research to make certain I was being accurate. One of the hardest things I had to do was find the name of the man who did the countdown for Apollo 11; it took me weeks to find out his name. By the way, his name is Jack King and as of the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing he was still alive and well!! ************** * 5. Do you see yourself writing other types of books in the future? * ************** I am planning on writing a book about the Holocaust which has so much potential. I’m not sure what direction it will take, but we shall see. I have already adapted my first book into a stage play; that was an interesting process and quite a bit of fun too! * *************** The script with limited production rights is available to any non-profit i.e. high school, college or community theater group at no charge; details can be found at: www.dandyflowers .com * *************** 6. Do you speak to groups? If so, do you enjoy it? * *************** I have spoken to book clubs and groups such as that. I do enjoy it, but being in front of groups of people is an easy thing for me to do. My “day job” is a paramedic, but I am no longer on an ambulance every day. Instead, I teach the continuing education for about 1,500 EMTs and paramedics in the Kansas City, Missouri Fire Department. If I can make it through that boisterous group, I can make it through anything! * *************** 7. What have you found surprising since becoming a published author? Just how much fun book signings can be; how much of an upper it is when someone tells you how much they loved reading the books! * *************** 8. Can you describe the day that you saw the first book you authored in your hands? * *************** I really do not recall the day I got the first copy of my first book, but I do remember with great clarity the day my kids saw it for the first time in Barnes & Noble. It was January 27, 2007 at 1:32 pm; I know this because I still have the picture I took on my cell phone that is time / date stamped. * *************** I knew ”Dandyflowers” was on the shelf so I slowly headed towards the aisle where it was and waited to see if my kids would notice it; they were oblivious. I finally put my hand on the shelf immediately underneath the book and drummed my fingers (yes, I’m subtle) when my then nine year old daughter finally saw it and pointed it out to my then six year old son. That day I got the best compliment from my kids. They said as they were holding a copy, “Daddy, we’re proud of you!” I will tell you I walked quite a bit taller the rest of that day! * **************** 9. Is there any particular thing that you wish you had known before getting the book in your hands? * **************** I wish I had known about vanity vs. traditional publishing. Knowing the difference would have saved me quite a bit of frustration and three to five years of lackluster results. * *************** 10. What was your favorite childhood toy? * *************** That is tough. I had a lot of toys that I enjoyed playing with while growing up. If I have to pick just one I’ll pick my snow sled. It’s about four feet long and has metal runners. It would scream down hills especially after you waxed the runners. It is nearly forty years old now and I still have it. I wish we would have had a good “sled snow” this past winter, my kids love riding on it almost as much as I did!

Friday, May 11, 2012

Interview with Warren Martin

This is an interview with author, Warren Martin 1. How long have you been an author and when did the desire to write (the writing bug) bite? I’ve been a published author just a short period of time with the release of my first book in May 2012. My interest was sparked about five years ago by chance when my son asked me to read something he was writing and it got me thinking about writing. I probably caught the bug to write when I was a kid living in New York City back in the early 1970’s watching shows like Mission Impossible. I got a typewriter, an instruction book and taught myself to type. I then started to write scripts for Mission Impossible and other shows as a hobby, although at that time I didn’t pursue it any further other than just writing. Over the years since living in New York I’ve had many ideas for books and movies and my wife Debbie believed my ideas were great and always encouraged me to start writing. 2. Why did you choose the genre you write in? Are there plans to write in another genre? I joined the Army in 1976 and served 21-years, retiring in 1996. The experiences I gained during my time in the Army has contributed a great deal to the knowledge I’ve gained and provides an excellent source for material. While in the Army I was in the Infantry, Military Police and Special Forces, all of which has provided me with a broad range experience that I can apply to writing in both the military and crime related genres. 3. Please tell about each title here: My first book is a fiction titled “Forgotten Soldiers: What Happened to Jacob Walden.” Although a war related subject, I consider the book to be more of a cold war mystery centering on an Air Force Captain shot down in Vietnam in 1970. I chose Forgotten Soldiers as a title because I felt it appropriate for the plot of the story that develops into a mystery of what happened to Jacob Walden. A hidden message in the book is to create awareness of the Cold War era and those who served during that period. 4. Do you do speaking engagements? Tell about your subject matter. I am available for speaking engagement and my current subject is the Cold War. Through the almost 40 year time span in my book I interject some Cold War events as they related to characters within the story. My intent for a speaking engagement is to provide a short review of the Cold War while interjecting the extreme seriousness of the period and sacrifices made by people who served. Each generation has a tendency to forget the past generations sacrifices and I would hope to share some knowledge that may instill upon anyone interested how important it is to learn from the lessons of history while remembering those who have seemingly been forgotten. 5. What has been your most rewarding experience as an author? So far the most rewarding experience has been getting the first book in the mail. But better than that was a few weeks later getting my first two customer responses within a few days of each other in which both said they couldn’t put the book down and read it in one night…now that was moment. 6. Where can your books be purchased? My book can be purchased direct from me through my website. On my website there are also links to Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads, and the Military Writers Society of America (MWSA). 7. How can readers reach you through twitter? through facebook? through your blog? through your website? I can be easily reached through an e-mail link on my website, on my blog, and on my Facebook page and also the Forgotten Soldiers Facebook page. 8. What was your biggest surprise at being an author? There were lots of surprises and I am still getting them every week, but I have to say the most unexpected was the support, closeness and general overall generosity and extensions of friendships from within the writing community. I was truly surprised with the genuine willingness of author and publishing related individuals and professionals to share their experience, knowledge and friendship. 9. What is your favorite hobby besides reading and writing? While it may not be considered a hobby by some, my work, participation and support of fraternal organizations that I am a member of is like a hobby to me. I’m chapter secretary of our local Chapter of the Special Forces Association and also a member of the American Legion and both organizations are very active in supporting charitable and services activities. Our Special Forces Chapter conducts an annual fund raiser event every August which has developed into a very worthwhile part of my life. We were fortunate this year to be given access to the Washington Missouri Fair for our event and are looking forward to a successful event. Green Beret Casualty Fund Benefit: https://www.facebook.com/GreenBeretCasualtyFundBenefit

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Murder in West Hollywood:The Dominique Dunne Story by Michael Eastman

This is an interview I did with a young man who has spent the last four years of his life investigating the death of Hollywood movie star, Dominique Dunne.







This interview will give you a glimpse into the work of a dedicated author who wants to get the facts straight for this non-fiction book because it deals with domestic violence and the ultimate crime of murder at the hands of the abuser.

Elaine Littau

Please tell me your author name and the genre you prefer to write.

Michael J. Eastman

I’m Michael Eastman, I hail from Houston, Texas, and I am currently writing a true-crime, non-fiction book about the tragic story of the late actress, Dominique Dunne. The book is called Murder in West Hollywood: The Dominique Dunne Story.




Elaine Littau

When did you know that you were a writer?

Michael J. Eastman

It all goes back to the 8th grade, from what I remember. It was English class; I don't recall the teacher's name, but I suddenly went from getting Ds in English to getting pretty good grades because I found I could enjoy writing and expressing myself. This teacher would always let us write stories in addition to doing the required work. I found it to be a lot of fun, and using my imagination. What was the most rewarding, however, was being accepted as a writer, however much in "infancy" I was at that time. It gave me a sense of something I could do, and be accepted at it. Self-worth really helps a child at that time in their lives.




Elaine Littau

I felt the same way about Jr. High and High School English class. It was something I never let on about lest the other students stone me to death.

Michael J. Eastman

When you come from a dysfunctional background as I did in my formative years, it was important to find something to get me though my life at that time. I wanted to be a football player, and I did play, but was not very athletic, so I found writing was for me, and I enjoyed it.




Elaine Littau

Tell me about your first writing experience.




Michael Eastman

Well, I am a two-time award-winning published poet, but that was mainly just for fun, but as far as anything professional, Hollywood is Dying was the first manuscript. Hollywood is Dying isn't actually about stars dying, but more about the industry itself seemingly dying due to running out of story ideas, lack of acting talent, etc. However, there is a chapter in it which covers those Hollywood stars who died tragically.




I began to write about Dominique's story, and then found that there was so much to tell, that is just simply had to have its own book. Her father, the late author and journalist, Dominick Dunne, had written about his daughter’s tragedy, but this will be the first time anyone has ever written a full book about it in much detail.




Elaine Littau

So, Hollywood is Dying was your first book?

Michael J. Eastman

Yes. A fun book, for the most part, whereas the Dominique Dunne book is a sad one. However, that book is still unpublished and is on hold until I finish my current one. Have some issues with that one, legally and financially, that still need to be worked out, because of all the copyrighted photos I need in it.




Elaine Littau

So what was the hook that got you started on the Dominique Dunne story?




Michael Eastman

Let me preface my comments here, Elaine, by saying that doing a book such as one where a Hollywood star - or any celebrity such as Elvis, Michael Jackson, etc. - can be very, very tough for the writer, especially if the author is an unknown commodity.




I had read Dominick Dunne's story about his daughter's death and the travesty that went on afterward in the courtroom where her killer went on trial, and basically walked away with a slap on the wrist.




I became emotional and angry over it, like many people have, and still are today. I said, "This just has to be told and looked into before this happens again to some poor woman!"




As I mentioned, I was working on my first book at the time and wanted to do a chapter on those Hollywood stars who had died tragically, and Dominique was one of the ones I was looking at to include in that book. Others were Natalie Wood, Mariska Hargitay's mother, Jane Mansfield, etc., but when I came upon Dominique's story, I just felt it needed to be told further than what her dad had mentioned. The more I read about it, the more intrigued and upset I became over the injustice that took place.

Elaine Littau

In telling a true story that is tragic and emotional, have you found that there are mountains of obstacles in getting the information about the circumstances of a victim’s death?

Michael J. Eastman

That is a huge understatement, yes indeed! And there are many reasons for that. Now, I can only speak for myself, and what I have experienced, but again, one is being an unknown author, where respect can be hard to come by. Locating the facts in a case can be a huge obstacle, also. You can get the basic facts from the internet that everyone else already knows, but you really have to dig deeper to find “the rest of the story,” as Paul Harvey used to say.




Other major factors for running into obstacles are that the family does not wish to be disturbed over it, nor reminded, so therefore, they want no part in helping you; plus there are privacy issues you try to not to invade, but at some point, you inadvertently do.




Another factor is that there are so many who have come before you with sleazy, tabloid intentions, that they have nearly ruined it for any good-intentioned authors who come along later.




Elaine Littau

How long ago was the murder?




Michael J. Eastman

1982. The trial took place in '83. Now, I want to say one thing more about Dominick Dunne...Nick, as he was called by his friends, did catch wind of my writing of his daughter's tragedy. And before he died a few years ago - August 2009, I think it was - he basically gave me his blessing via a friend of his, who forwarded me his e-mail.




Nick Dunne told his friend to tell me he appreciated what I was doing, but that he was too sick, too old, and didn't want to hurt all over again. Nick Dunne was dying of pancreatic cancer by then.




Mr. Dunne was very generous to have given me his approval, permission, or whatever you want to call it. That meant so very much to me!




Elaine Littau

For my readers and I, could you remind us of the movies, etc. that Miss Dunne appeared in.




Michael J. Eastman

Well, her most famous role was as the older daughter, Dana Freeling, in Poltergeist, but she also turned a memorable performance on TV's Fame, among her many other television appearances. She was an up-and-coming actress, so she really was just getting started in the business, but had a promising career. I feel her future, after all my research, would have been more in television than in films, but that's just my opinion.




Her brother is actor/producer/director, Griffin Dunne. Her aunt is author and playwright, Joan Didion, and her uncle, the late author and screenwriter, John Gregory Dunne.

Elaine Littau

Did you have to become part detective/part author in your research?

Michael J. Eastman

Indeed I did! You have no idea. And part archaeologist, too, recovering all the records and all the names of those involved; we’re talking hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles to comb through, as well as official court documents. And it was very frustrating at times, too, because of either the lack of information, wrong information, or lack of cooperation. For example, it took me a good six months before I found out the name of the priest who did Dominique’s funeral. It was very difficult to find because it had never been published, to my knowledge, and the church refused to help due to privacy issues, I presume. Her dad kept this priest’s name out of any write ups he did about the case, and I think I know why, but because of necessary detective work, I have uncovered this, as well as many other names and details never before revealed, including all the way down to the alternate jury members in the case.




Elaine Littau

When you began writing the story, where did you start?

Michael J. Eastman

At her grave, as morbid as that sounds. I mean, if you are going to do this, you really have to involve yourself, emotionally, and what better way to do that than to start there at reality 101?




Elaine Littau

In addition to locating all the information about the case, what other hurdles might you have had to clear when writing about this case?

Michael J. Eastman

When you do a story such as this one, where there are feelings to consider of the family, you want to do it the right way, and respectfully. So, you have to keep the family in mind, but this book is “pro-Dunne family” anyway, so I don’t think I did too much to offend her brothers or relatives. It is basically an unauthorized biography of Dominique and her case, but that doesn’t mean when you write an unauthorized version of someone’s life you have to offend the family.

Elaine Littau

Despite not getting all the help and cooperation you needed, you have kept yourself going with your goal of getting this story told. Have you reached your goals you set out to accomplish?




Michael J. Eastman

Although I've gotten little help or respect, I walk on, and you have to, because you know despite all, you are doing the right thing in telling this story.




You see, my intentions are two-fold:




To, in some way, help prevent this thing from happening to another woman. It's a story about a domestic abuse case turning deadly. If in the end with this story I can help save even ONE life, then it will be worth it.




I also wish to educate potential future jury members on what to be on the lookout for in cases such as this one, where the sleazy defense attorneys will turn the tables on the victim and put her on trial instead of the guilty party, as if she deserved what she got. So, this is what has kept me going with this story, keeping those goals in mind. And it’s not entirely a negative story; you get to see the good side of Dominique Dunne’s life, as well. I did not write solely about her death and the trial.




Elaine Littau

Those are angles I hadn't thought of.




Michael J. Eastman

Yes...You must have a goal if you are going to write about a true story, and if you are not a sleazy tabloid writer, than you need to have positive goals that many can benefit from.




I have spent thousands of my own dollars going back and forth to Los Angeles for this story, as well as spent countless hours in research, so one would have to really believe in what one is doing in order to spend the money and the time and the effort on a project like this.




Elaine Littau

It seems to be a true calling.




Michael J. Eastman

Just to elaborate some more on what I said, I’ve spent countless hours telling this story in writing; traveling to locations having to do with this tragedy; interviewing people that really do not want to be interviewed about this; making cold calls to places such as courts, hospitals, studios, ambulance companies, homes of people who knew her, etc., so it is not easy at all - I do not want to paint a false picture here.




Writing fiction is so much easier than doing a non-fiction story, because of the aforementioned reasons I listed, but also because you had better have your facts in order, because I guarantee you someone will come along later to correct you, if not sue you!




Elaine Littau

This is true.




Michael J. Eastman

I wanna tell ya, that is one of an author's biggest fears is being sued. You must retain a copyright attorney, and if you're writing about a celebrity, find one who has experience in that field, as well, an entertainment lawyer. I got lucky and found one who does both.




Elaine Littau

Those steps are vital. The copyright attorney, etc.




Michael J. Eastman

You bet! Now, don't let those obstacles prevent you from doing your story if you really believe in it, and are searching your best to find the facts.




Elaine Littau

Were you surprised with any of your research that was easier than you thought, or was it all difficult?




Michael J. Eastman

Well, I was pleasantly surprised at times when those few people stepped up to the plate for me. Like for example, one of the witnesses to the assault on Dominique, six weeks before she was murdered. That woman's name is Denise Dennehy, and she was actually there, so I got a star witness, if you will, to help me out and tell the story with facts! Very important, and gives your story much needed credibility.




Also, I am grateful to the Los Angeles County courts for keeping great records on microfiche after all this time passed. The personnel there at both the courthouse and the archives building were very, very helpful to me! Then there are the public libraries in Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, and in Houston that were really wonderful. There were also some that weren’t so wonderful, like the West Hollywood Sheriff’s Department, or the Schaeffer Ambulance Company, who transported Dominique that night to Cedars-Sinai.




Can I tell you real quick about meeting the jury foreman in the case?




Elaine Littau

Sure, please do.

Michael J. Eastman

I tracked down the jury foreman from the trial in 1983, and he was shocked to hear from me and that a book was being done about the case. He was a real jerk, for the most part, but he did give me some insider information about what went on in the jury room during the trial, and also how it effected him, etc. We were supposed to meet at L.A.X. in person for an in-person interview, but he failed to show. I called him later, but he said he was busy. I've never attempted to call him back. You see, I am of the attitude that I will take help from anyone who wishes to, and brush off any who don't. The story is going to be told, either way, but it sure is nice to get the cooperation when I can get it.




Elaine Littau

How long have you been on this project?




Michael J. Eastman

Four years now. I am finding new info. all the time, but then again, most of my research work is done now.




Elaine LittauIt takes a lot of courage to write on this subject matter. Thank you for your work.




Michael J. Eastman

Yes, it does. But, again, an author with the right heart is the only one who should be writing a book like this. It's shameful that tabloid writers have come along prior to make it tough for legitimate writers, but it can be done!




You gotta have a tough, determined attitude about you when you write non-fiction, realizing that you may not get the cooperation from many people. Do it anyway - write the story! Put your heart into it, make your readers feel the same emotions you do, or those of the victim’s family!




Finally, Elaine, I want to tell those authors wishing to write a story like I am this: be ready for false accusations or assumptions made about you as to what your intentions are. For example, people, even the media, may rip you for trying to make a buck off a tragedy, dead celebrity, or whatever, but if that is not your mission, than ignore it and carry on.




Elaine Littau

It is too bad that many women have died by the hand of an abuser even since Dominique's death.




Michael J. Eastman

Sure is, but the system is getting better, and women are becoming more educated as to what to do. I am not an expert in the field of domestic abuse, but I have called in some who are in my book. I have interviewed a couple, or quoted them from their own books.




Elaine LittauHow on Earth do you find a way to put an end to a story like this one?




Michael J. Eastman

With hope, you know, that’s how I want to end it; hope for those domestic abuse victims still out there. It’s also important to remember the victim, Dominique Dunne, and what a wonderful person she sure seemed like.

I wish to have all this done by the end of this summer, and self-published soon after.

In closing, I would like to thank you for your interest in this book, and helping to get the word out! Again, the book is titled, Murder in West Hollywood: The Dominique Dunne Story.




Elaine Littau

Thank you, Michael Eastman. May your efforts be rewarded with lives saved and changed.

Michael Eastman

Thanks, and may God bless your work as an author, as well